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Prehistoric Archaeology: Archaeologists discovered a flintstone workshop of Neanderthals in the southern Poland; it is approx. 60,000 years old

Researchers discovered a flint workshop of Neanderthals in Pietraszyno (Silesia). According to scientists, it is the first such large workshop in Central Europe that was not located in a cave. So far, researchers have counted 17,000 stone products created 60 thousand years ago.Neandertals (Homo neanderthalensis) were very close relatives of contemporary man (Homo sapiens). They probably…

2019-03-18 08:53   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Ancient switch to soft food gave us an overbite—and the ability to pronounce ‘f’s and ‘v’s

An ancient woman from Romania shows an edgeto-edge bite (left). A Bronze Age man from Austria had a slight overbite (right). D. E. BLASI ET AL., SCIENCE, 363, 1192 (2019)Don't like the F-word? Blame farmers and soft food. When humans switched to processed foods after the spread of agriculture, they put less wear and tear on their teeth. That changed the growth of their jaws, giving adults the…

2019-03-18 08:47   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Ancient migration transformed Spain's DNA

Bronze Age burials: Iberia saw a dramatic genetic shift during this periodL BENITEZ DE LUGO ENRICH - JOSE LUIS FUENTES SANCHA migration from Central Europe transformed the genetic make-up of people in Spain during the Bronze Age, a study reveals.DNA evidence shows the migrants streamed over the Pyrenees, replacing existing male lineages across the region within a space of 400 years.It remains…

2019-03-18 08:19   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Neandertaler und moderne Menschen hatten ähnliche Speisezettel

Knochen aus Spy geben Aufschluss über Ernährung und Mobilität der dortigen Neandertaler. Foto: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS)Internationale Studie findet mehr gemeinsame Nahrungsvorlieben als angenommen ‒ Rätselhafte Spuren von KannibalismusNeandertaler und der frühe moderne Mensch ernährten sich vermutlich sehr ähnlich: Zu diesem Schluss kommt eine internationale Studie…

2019-03-18 08:16   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Hominids may have hunted rabbits as far back as 400,000 years ago

BUNNY TRAIL Fossils from southern European sites indicate that ancient relatives of humans hunted small, fast animals as early as around 400,000 years ago. Ends of rabbit bones (shown) were probably snapped off to remove marrow.In Europe, Stone Age hominids began adding small, fast animals to their menus much earlier than previously thought, scientists say.Now-extinct members of the human…

2019-03-14 17:02   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Researchers find a piece of Palaeolithic art featuring birds and humans

A tracing of the engraved figures over the stone [Credit: University of Barcelona]It is not very common to find representations of scenes instead of individual figures in Palaeolithic art, but it is even harder for these figures to be birds instead of mammals such as goats, deer or horses. So far, historians have only found three scenes of Palaeolithic art featuring humans and birds in…

2019-03-14 16:58   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Stonehenge was 'hub for Britain's earliest mass parties'

Pigs were the main food at the feasts and were brought from as far away as Scotland and the North East of England to StonehengeENGLISH HERITAGE/PAEvidence of large-scale prehistoric feasting rituals found at Stonehenge could be the earliest mass celebrations in Britain, say archaeologists.The study examined 131 pigs' bones at four Late Neolithic sites, Durrington Walls, Marden, Mount Pleasant…

2019-03-14 16:54   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: HABITATS DE L’ÂGE DU BRONZE, SILOS ET RITUELS GAULOIS À FAUX-FRESNAY

À Faux-Fresnay, dans la Marne, une équipe d’archéologues de l’Inrap a découvert des vestiges de deux villages de l’âge du Bronze et de l’âge du Fer qui témoignent d’une importante activité agricole. Des silos où reposent des restes d’animaux interrogent sur des rituels qui auraient impliqué le cheptel. Cette fouille est réalisée en amont de l’aménagement d’un poste électrique par RTE.Read the…

2019-03-14 16:51   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: In Europa lebten im frühen Jungpaläolithikum im Schnitt nur 1.500 Menschen

Mit einem an der Universität zu Köln entwickelten Protokoll können die Forscherinnen und Forscher des Sonderforschungsbereiches 806 "Our Way to Europe" rekonstruieren, wie die Besiedlung Europas durch den anatomisch modernen Menschen verlief. Die Daten zeigen, dass die Population der gesamten europäischen Jäger und Sammler in der Zeitspanne von etwa 42.000 bis etwa 33.000 Jahren vor heute –…

2019-03-14 16:49   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: 'Hobbit' human story gets a twist, thanks to thousands of rat bones

The limestone cave of Liang Bua, on the Indonesian island of Flores, is widely known as the hobbit cave, the site where the surprisingly tiny and enormously controversial extinct human relative Homo floresiensis was discovered. But to the scientists who excavate there, the site is known as something else entirely: the rat cave.“The first time I went to the excavations at Liang Bua, I remember…

2019-03-12 15:57   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Neolithic skull found by Thames 'mudlarkers'

The frontal bone was radiocarbon dated to 3,600 BCMUSEUM OF LONDONHere's a piece of history pulled from the muddy banks of the River Thames.It's a skull fragment that is 5,600 years old. It dates to a time long before there was any permanent settlement on the site we now know as London.Investigations indicate it belonged to a male over the age of 18.There are older Neolithic remains that have…

2019-02-26 07:25   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Stonehenge: Archaeologists discover long-lost tools used to build ancient monument

Scientists know the Stonehenge early phase standing stones (the so-called bluestones rather than the later more famous and much larger sarsen stones) come from this and other Pembrokeshire prehistoric quarries – because of chemical identification tests they have carried out on the rocks.So far, only two quarries have been identified – both on the northern slopes of the Preseli Hills in…

2019-02-19 19:11   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Suspected Neanderthal footprints have been found in Gibraltar

A footprint which could belong to one of the last Neanderthals to walk the Earth has been found in Gibraltar.Although most Neanderthals died out by around 40,000 years ago, some did survive at the edge of the Iberian peninsular, where stone tools prove they were still alive around 28,000 years ago.Now researchers at The Gibraltar National Museum, who have spent the last decade studying…

2019-02-19 08:40   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Britain’s largest Neolithic house ‘built in Scotland’

The remains of the largest Neolithic hall found in Britain, which was were discovered in Carnoustie, Angus. PIC: GUARD Archaeology.The largest Neolithic house in Britain was built in Scotland around 6,000 years ago, archaeologists have confirmedTwo halls which were used as houses and likely home to large numbers of people have been discovered in Carnoustie, Angus.The site is far larger and…

2019-02-19 08:37   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Ancient burial site and monument found in England's New Forest

he urns contained cremated human bone and had been placed into small pits [Credit: New Forest National Park Authority via BBC]Archaeologists and volunteers have found an important prehistoric burial site near Beaulieu dating back thousands of years.A community dig in a field at East End set out to investigate what they thought was a Bronze Age barrow which had been ploughed over and they were…

2019-02-19 08:06   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Pembrokeshire chariot burial finds ruled as treasure

his terret ring would have guided the chariot reinsParts of an Iron Age chariot found by a metal detectorist have been declared treasure by the Pembrokeshire coroner.Mike Smith made the discovery in February 2018 on farmland in the south of the county.The court at Milford Haven heard on Thursday the finds were part of the ritual burial of an entire chariot and that the site is now legally…

2019-02-19 07:59   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Mittelalterliche Siedlungsspuren gesucht – 3.000 Jahre altes Grab gefunden

Dynamische Interaktionszone am Nordrand des KaukasusEin internationales Forschungsteam koordiniert von der Eurasien-Abteilung des Deutschen Archäologischen Instituts (DAI) in Berlin und dem Max-Planck-Institut für Menschheitsgeschichte in Jena (MPI-SHH) konnte erstmals systematische paläogenetische Untersuchungen im Kaukasus durchführen. Die kürzlich erschienene Studie fußt auf den Analysen…

2019-02-19 07:50   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Stonehenge tunnel: The background to the row

Will tunnel destroy secrets of Stonehenge?Stonehenge is one of the UK's most popular tourist attractions, drawing 1.5m visitors visitors alone last year. But plans to build a road tunnel nearby to help ease congestion have enraged some archaeologists.Here is the background to the row.Why is a tunnel being built?Visitors to Stonehenge typically arrive there via the A303, a major link road…

2018-12-06 17:45   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: First ancient DNA from mainland Finland reveals origins of Siberian ancestry in region

New study shows that the genetic makeup of northern Europe traces back to migrations from Siberia that began at least 3,500 years ago and that, as recently as the Iron Age, ancestors of the Saami lived in a larger area of Finland than today.Researchers from the Max-Planck-Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Helsinki have analyzed the first ancient DNA from…

2018-12-06 17:42   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Archaeologists uncover rare Celtic remains

A bronze clothes pin and ceramic object typically found in the 1st century BC.(Kanton Luzern)Archaeologists from canton Lucerne have uncovered rare Celtic remains on a construction site in the city of Egolzwil about 35 kilometres from the city of Lucerne. The discovery of a bronze piece of jewellery is considered a particularly exceptional finding.The fact that Celts once lived in canton…

2018-10-23 08:06   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: World's oldest intact shipwreck discovered in Black Sea

Archaeologists say the 23-metre vessel has lain undisturbed for more than 2,400 yearsArchaeologists have found what they believe to be the world’s oldest intact shipwreck at the bottom of the Black Sea where it appears to have lain undisturbed for more than 2,400 years.The 23-metre (75ft) vessel, thought to be ancient Greek, was discovered with its mast, rudders and rowing benches all present…

2018-10-23 07:41   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: A14 road workers find woolly mammoth bones

The remains are thought to date back to the last Ice AgeRoad workers building a new bypass have unearthed the Ice Age remains of a woolly mammoth and a woolly rhino.The team, working on improvements to the A14 between Cambridge and Huntingdon, discovered a number of bones while digging near Fenstanton.Experts believe the remains, found in what was once an ancient river, could be at least…

2018-10-23 07:35   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Ancient cemetery unearthed in Albania

URAN, Albania (AP) — In a rich agricultural basin near the town of Korca in southeastern Albania, gas pipeline construction work is offering archaeologists a unique insight into 5,000 years of history in a country that was off most experts’ radar during decades of isolationist Communist rule.The excavations near the village of Turan, which ended Friday after 18 months, have unearthed one of…

2018-10-02 07:01   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Experts ask if there was a tsunami in ancient Orkney

Maesehowe is Orkney's most famous burial cairn, and a popular tourist attractionA new academic paper has suggested it is possible neolithic mass burials in Orkney and Shetland contain the bodies of tsunami victims.The authors said archaeologists should test remains to see if the bones show the distinctive signs of drowning in sea water.Prof James Goff said the work was based on findings from…

2018-08-06 16:17   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Stonehenge: Origins of those who built world-famous monument revealed by groundbreaking scientific research

Experts have discovered act of cremation actually crystallises a bone’s structure and allows its origins to be detected – something previously thought to be impossibleA new scientific research collaboration is, for the first time, revealing who built Stonehenge. The cutting-edge study sheds a remarkable light on the geographical origins of the Neolithic community that first constructed the…

2018-08-06 16:15   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Small height evolved twice on 'Hobbit' island of Flores

Liang Bua cave, where the Hobbit remains were foundROSINO / CREATIVE COMMONSA new study has shown that small height evolved twice in humans on the Indonesian island of Flores.Scientists decoded the DNA of modern-day "pygmy" people to find out if they might be partly descended from the extinct Hobbit species.The remains of these Hobbits were found during an archaeological dig on Flores 15 years…

2018-08-06 16:12   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Stonehenge: First residents from west Wales

Researchers have shown that cremated humans at Stonehenge were from the same region of Wales as the stones used in construction.The key question was to understand the geographic origin of the people buried at Stonehenge.The key innovation was finding that high temperatures of cremation can crystallise a skull, locking in the chemical signal of its origin.The findings have been published in the…

2018-08-06 16:09   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Roadworks reveal remains of Iron Age village in York

An enclosure measuring 16 metres across is believed to date from the Iron Age [Credit: City of York Council]The earliest find – a large ring ditch which could have been an enclosure or roundhouse – appears to date from the Iron Age, around 2,500 years ago. At around 16 metres in diameter, it is one of the biggest to be unearthed in York.Pits and what looks to be a hearth have been found…

2018-07-27 15:48   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Treasure found across Northern Ireland

More than 40 objects found across Northern Ireland between 2009 and 2016 have been officially categorised as "treasure" by a coroner.The items include a variety of precious rings, jewellery and Viking coins.They were found by members of the public through metal-detecting, as well as by archaeologists on excavation.After examination both by the coroner and the British Museum, some of the…

2018-07-27 15:43   Click to comment

Prehistoric Archaeology: Lessons From A Real Atlantis

Before it was lost to the bottom of sea, Doggerland was made up of woodland, meadows, marshes and rivers, as shown by simulations [Credit: Philip Murgatroyd]The discoveries, both on land and underwater, are helping to fill in some of the blanks about Europe’s prehistory and are offering insights into how our species responded to global climate change in the past.Around 8,500 years ago, after…

2018-07-19 10:56   Click to comment


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