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Archaeology News Report: Earliest known Mariner's Astrolabe

IMAGE: Guinness World Records have independently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portuguese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in... view more Credit: David Mearns Guinness World Records have independently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portuguese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage…

2019-03-18 22:50   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Diet-related changes in human bite spread new speech sounds

Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds University of Zurich Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers at the University of Zurich has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history. Human…

2019-03-14 21:06   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Genetic history of the Iberian Peninsula revealed by dual studies

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IMAGE: Excavation work in progress at the site of Balma Guilanyà. view more Credit: CEPAP-UAB An international team of researchers have analyzed ancient DNA from almost 300 individuals from the Iberian Peninsula, spanning more than 12,000 years, in two studies published today in Current Biology and Science. The first study looked at hunter-gatherers and early farmers living in Iberia…

2019-03-14 21:03   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) suggests that the Iberian male lineages were almost completely replaced between 4,500 and 4,000 years ago by newcomers originating…

IMAGE: The University of Huddersfield's Archaeogenetics Research Group joined an international team conducting the study which spanned an 8,000-year period. view more Credit: University of Huddersfield THE University of Huddersfield's Archaeogenetics Research Group has been involved in a major international collaboration documenting the settlement of Iberia over the last eight thousand…

2019-03-14 20:40   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Thanks to pig remains, scientists uncover extensive human mobility to sites near Stonehenge

A mutli-isotope analysis of pigs remains found around henge complexes near Stonehenge has revealed the large extent and scale of movements of human communities in Britain during the Late Neolithic. The findings "demonstrate a level of interaction and social complexity not previously appreciated," the authors say, and provide insight into more than a century of debate surrounding the origins…

2019-03-13 21:33   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: How tiny tools may have made us human

IMAGE: The iconic, tear-drop shaped hand axe, which filled a human palm, required a large toolkit to produce (left), in contrast to a toolkit for tiny flakes. view more Credit: Emory University Anthropologists have long made the case that tool-making is one of the key behaviors that separated our human ancestors from other primates. A new paper, however, argues that it was not tool-making…

2019-03-12 20:32   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Researchers find a piece of Palaeolithic art featuring birds and humans

An exceptional milestone in European Palaeolithic rock art

University of Barcelona IMAGE: Image of the findings with a tracing of the engraved figures on the piece. view more Credit: UNIVERSITY OF BARCELONA It is not very common to find representations of scenes instead of individual figures in Palaeolithic art, but it is even harder for these figures to be birds instead of mammals such as…

2019-03-11 22:21   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Hundreds of children and llamas sacrificed in a ritual event in 15th century Peru

The largest sacrifice of its kind known from the Americas was associated with heavy rainfall and flooding

IMAGE: Mummified children view more Credit: John Verano (2019) A mass sacrifice at a 15th century archaeological site in Peru saw the ritual killing of over 140 children and over 200 llamas, according to a study released March 6, 2019 in the open access journal PLOS ONE by Gabriel Prieto…

2019-03-06 22:04   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Oldest tattoo tool in western North America

IMAGE: This is a close up of a 2,000-year-old cactus spine tattoo tool discovered by WSU archaeologist Andrew Gillreath-Brown. view more Credit: Bob Hubner/WSU PULLMAN, Wash. - Washington State University archaeologists have discovered the oldest tattooing artifact in western North America. With a handle of skunkbush and a cactus-spine business end, the tool was made around 2,000 years ago…

2019-03-01 03:58   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Earlier emergence of malaria in Africa

Institut Pasteur IMAGE: New research suggests an earlier emergence of malaria in Africa. view more Credit: © Institut Pasteur Malaria, which claims hundreds of thousands of lives each year - mainly children and especially in Africa -, is one of the leading causes of death by an infectious agent, the Plasmodium falciparum parasite. In research on malaria, the genetic mutation that causes…

2019-03-01 03:57   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Northwest Coast clam gardens nearly 2,000 years older than previously thought

IMAGE: A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous food security systems located along B.C.'s coast, date back... view more Credit: Nicole Smith A study led by SFU archaeology professor Dana Lepofsky and Hakai Institute researcher Nicole Smith reveals that clam gardens, ancient Indigenous…

2019-02-27 22:16   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: 'Ibiza is different', genetically A

An investigation reveals that Ibizans are genetically different from the rest of Spain inhabitants. The genetic difference is comparable to that between Basques and the rest of peninsular inhabitants, considered a genetic anomaly to date. Universitat Pompeu Fabra - Barcelona IMAGE: These are remains of the Phoenician settlement of Sa Caleta (Ibiza). view more Credit: UPF Ibiza is…

2019-02-26 21:54   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Ancient poop helps show climate change contributed to fall of Cahokia

A new study shows climate change may have contributed to the decline of Cahokia, a famed prehistoric city near present-day St. Louis. And it involves ancient human poop. Published today [Feb. 25, 2019] in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the study provides a direct link between changes in Cahokia's population size as measured through a unique fecal record and environmental…

2019-02-25 23:07   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Neanderthals walked upright just like the humans of today U

IMAGE: Virtual reconstruction of the skeleton found in La Chapelle-aux-Saints, based on high-resolution 3D surface scans of the spine and pelvis. view more Credit: Martin Häusler, UZH Neanderthals are often depicted as having straight spines and poor posture. However, these prehistoric humans were more similar to us than many assume. University of Zurich researchers have shown that…

2019-02-25 22:58   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: New research casts doubt on cause of Angkor's collapse

University of Sydney IMAGE: The ancient city of Angkor, Cambodia. view more Credit: The University of Sydney New University of Sydney research has revealed the ancient Cambodian city of Angkor underwent a gradual decline in occupation rather than an abrupt collapse. Researchers have long debated the causes of Angkor's demise in the 15th century. Historical explanations have emphasised the…

2019-02-25 22:56   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Foxes were domesticated by humans in the Bronze Age

IMAGE: Artistic representation of a woman of the Bronze Age accompanied by a dog and a fox. view more Credit: J. A. Peñas In the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, between the third and second millennium BC, a widespread funeral practice consisted in burying humans with animals. Scientists have discovered that both foxes and dogs were domesticated, as their diet was similar to that of…

2019-02-21 23:51   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Pottery reveals America's first social media networks

Ancient Indigenous societies, including Mississippian Mound cultures, were built through social networks, PNAS study suggests

Washington University in St. Louis IMAGE: Examples of the kinds of pottery produced by people living across southern Appalachia between AD 800 and 1650. The unique symbols were stamped onto the pottery when the clay was... view more Credit: Jacob Lulewicz Long…

2019-02-19 23:27   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Neandertals' main food source was definitely meat

IMAGE: Tooth of an adult Neandertal from Les Cottés in France. Her diet consisted mainly of the meat of large herbivore mammals. view more Credit: © MPI f. Evolutionary Anthropology/ A. Le Cabec Neandertals' diets are highly debated: they are traditionally considered carnivores and hunters of large mammals, but this hypothesis has recently been challenged by numerous pieces of evidence of…

2019-02-19 23:26   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: The monkey hunters: Humans colonize South Asian rainforest by hunting primates

IMAGE: This is an exterior view of the entrance of Fa-Hien Lena cave in Sri Lanka. view more Credit: O. Wedage A multidisciplinary study has found evidence for humans hunting small mammals in the forests of Sri Lanka at least 45,000 years ago. The researchers discovered the remains of small mammals, including primates, with evidence of cut-marks and burning at the oldest archaeological…

2019-02-19 23:20   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Quarrying of Stonehenge 'bluestones' dated to 3000 BC

IMAGE: This is the Stonehenge quarry. view more Credit: UCL Excavations at two quarries in Wales, known to be the source of the Stonehenge 'bluestones', provide new evidence of megalith quarrying 5,000 years ago, according to a new UCL-led study. Geologists have long known that 42 of Stonehenge's smaller stones, known as 'bluestones', came from the Preseli hills in Pembrokeshire, west…

2019-02-19 23:17   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: A shared past for East Africa's hunter-gatherers

A genomic analysis suggests African hunting and gathering groups diverged from a common ancestry, and underscores the role of infectious disease and diet as drivers of local adaptation University of Pennsylvania IMAGE: With the help of a local translator, Simon Thompson from Sarah Tishkoff's lab (University of Pennsylvania) and Dawit Wolde-Meskel (collaborator from Addis Ababa University)…

2019-02-18 22:29   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Biocolonizer species are putting the conservation of the granite at Machu Picchu at risk

IMAGE: There is a wide variety of biocolonizer species that are putting the conservation of the granite at Machu Picchu at risk. view more Credit: Héctor Morillas / UPV/EHU The Sacred Rock is one of the most important monuments at the Inca sanctuary Machu Picchu, located in the Cusco region in Peru. It is a granitic rock that the Inca culture used for religious worship as it was regarded…

2019-02-14 22:53   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Dog burial as common ritual in Neolithic populations of north-eastern Iberian Peninsula

IMAGE: Top: remains of adult dog in partial anatomical connection in La Serreta. Bottom: dog in anatomical connection between human skeletons, in the necropolis Bòbila Madurell. view more Credit: UB-UAB Coinciding with the Pit Grave culture (4200-3600 years before our era), coming from Southern Europe, the Neolithic communities of the north-eastern Iberian Peninsula started a ceremonial…

2019-02-14 22:47   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Safe harbor for Native residents during the Mission era and beyond

*Latest findings will be discussed during the Society for California Archaeology annual meeting March 7-10 in SacramentoUniversity of California - Santa Cruz IMAGE: This obsidian point was recovered from the site of a 19th-century Coast Miwok village. view more Credit: Carolyn Lagattuta Contrary to the dominant narrative of cultural extinction, indigenous residents of Marin County survived…

2019-02-14 22:46   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: First Neanderthal footprints found in Gibraltar

IMAGE: The place where the footprint was found. view more Credit: Universdad de Sevilla The prestigious international journal Quaternary Science Reviews has just published a paper which has involved the participation of Gibraltarian scientists from The Gibraltar National Museum alongside colleagues from Spain, Portugal and Japan. The results which have been published come from an area of the…

2019-02-13 23:21   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Latest Archaeological Reports

Southeast Asia Humans colonized diverse environments in Southeast Asia and Oceania during the Pleistocene Jonathan KantrowitzatArchaeology News Report - 1 week ago[image: IMAGE] *IMAGE: *Lowland Palawan, the Philippines -- Southeast Asia offers a particularly exciting region in regard of early hominin movements across the supposed "Movius Line " a boundary previously argued to separate…

2019-02-09 03:36   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: 'X-ray gun' helps researchers pinpoint the origins of pottery found on ancient shipwreck

Field Museum IMAGE: Ceramic bowls in situ at the Java Sea Shipwreck site. view more Credit: (c) Field Museum, Anthropology. Photographer Pacific Sea Resources. About eight hundred years ago, a ship sank in the Java Sea off the coast of the islands of Java and Sumatra in Indonesia. There are no written records saying where the ship was going or where it came from--the only clues are the…

2019-02-08 23:38   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: 10:37 am / The First Art Newspaper on the Net Established in 1996 United States Thursday, February 7, 2019 Home Last Week Artists Galleries Museums Photographers Games Subscribe Comments…

An archaeological site near Golden, Colorado, was occupied by humans thousands of years earlier than originally understood, according to new research conducted by the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in partnership with the Paleocultural Research Group and the University of Kansas Odyssey Archaeological Research Program. The site, nicknamed Magic Mountain, served as a campground for nomadic…

2019-02-07 15:44   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Peasant farmers began transforming diets across the Old World 7,000 years ago

Since the beginning of archaeology, researchers have combed the globe searching for evidence of the first domesticated crops. Painstakingly extracting charred bits of barley, wheat, millet and rice from the remains of ancient hearths and campfires, they've published studies contending that a particular region or country was among the first to bring some ancient grain into cultivation.Now, an…

2019-02-07 14:48   Click to comment

Archaeology News Report: Vikings enjoyed a warmer Greenland

Northwestern University IMAGE: This is a 21st-century reproduction of Thjodhild's church on Erik the Red's estate (known as Brattahlíð) in present day Qassiarsuk, Greenland. view more Credit: G. Everett Lasher/Northwestern UniversityA new study may resolve an old debate about how tough the Vikings actually were. Although TV and movies paint Vikings as robust souls, braving subzero…

2019-02-06 23:18   Click to comment


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