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Current Archaeology: Current Archaeology Awards 2019: Photos

Scroll down to view pictures from the 11th annual Current Archaeology Awards. Click the image to view a high-resolution version. All pictures should be credited as stated in the image caption. The winners of the 11th annual Current Archaeology Awards were announced on Friday 8 March, as part of Current Archaeology Live! 2019. The awards celebrate the projects and publications […]

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2019-03-14 12:48   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: PRESS RELEASE: Richard Osgood wins Current Archaeology’s prestigious Archaeologist of the Year award for 2019

Top honours for Archaeologist of the Year at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards 2019 went to Richard Osgood of the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO). In 2011, Richard co-founded Operation Nightingale – an award-winning initiative using archaeological fieldwork to aid the recovery of wounded veterans – and since then the project has gone from strength to […]

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2019-03-14 12:45   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: PRESS RELEASE: Archaeological dig along the A14 – one of the largest archaeological projects ever undertaken in the UK – wins Current Archaeology’s prestigious Rescue Project of the Year…

A prestigious archaeological award for Rescue Project of the Year 2019 has gone to MOLA Headland Infrastructure for their work along the A14. Major road-improvement works on the A14 afforded the opportunity to investigate an entire landscape over six millennia, and was one of the largest and most complex archaeological projects ever undertaken in the […]

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2019-03-14 12:44   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: PRESS RELEASE: Largest ever ancient DNA study – showing at least 90% of British ancestry was replaced by a wave of migrants from the Continent around 4,500 years ago – wins Current…

The work of Iñigo Olalde and colleagues examined the Bell Beaker Complex – a hugely popular cultural phenomenon that swept through Europe and Britain during the 3rd millennium BC. This massive ancient DNA project illuminated how it developed and spread, showing that it had a particularly profound impact on the population of Bronze Age Britain, […]

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2019-03-14 12:36   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: PRESS RELEASE: ‘The Old Stones: a field guide to the megalithic sites of Britain and Ireland’ wins Current Archaeology’s prestigious Book of the Year award for 2019

Winner of the award for Book of the Year 2019 was The Old Stones: a field guide to the megalithic sites of Britain and Ireland, by Andy Burnham and published by Watkins Publishing. This 400+ page field guide of over 1,000 sites does everything it promises and is another dedicated testament to the might of […]

The post PRESS RELEASE: ‘The Old Stones: a field guide to the megalithic sites of…

2019-03-14 12:28   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: PRESS RELEASE: Richard Osgood wins Current Archaeology’s prestigious Archaeologist of the Year award for 2019

Top honours for Archaeologist of the Year at the prestigious Current Archaeology Awards 2019 went to Richard Osgood of the Defence Infrastructure Organisation (DIO). In 2011, Richard co-founded Operation Nightingale – an award-winning initiative using archaeological fieldwork to aid the recovery of wounded veterans – and since then the project has gone from strength to […]

The post PRESS…

2019-03-14 12:20   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Current Archaeology Awards 2019: Photos

Scroll down to view pictures from the 11th annual Current Archaeology Awards. Click the image to view a high-resolution version. All pictures should be credited as stated in the image caption.

The post Current Archaeology Awards 2019: Photos appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-13 15:47   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 201-300, part I

In my last two columns I picked some favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986-2005) of Current Archaeology. I continue this series in the next two columns, focusing on CA 201-300 (2006-2015). Current Archaeology readers of this period and onwards benefited from the wider shift in publishing that had taken place in the early 2000s, when the cost of using colour in magazines dropped…

2019-03-11 10:29   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: The Shropshire bulla: Bronze Age beauty and a mystery from Manchester

What does a spectacular, recently found gold object add to our understanding of Bronze Age artistry, and can it help to solve a nearly 250 year-old mystery? Carly Hilts spoke to Peter Reavill, Neil Wilkin, Duncan Hook, and Dan O’Flynn to find out more.

The post The Shropshire bulla: Bronze Age beauty and a mystery from Manchester appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-11 10:18   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Finding Captain Flinders at Euston

Archaeologists have identified the grave of the 19th-century explorer Matthew Flinders while excavating at Euston Station as part of the HS2 scheme.

The post Finding Captain Flinders at Euston appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-11 10:13   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Roman ruins revealed under the Mercury Theatre

Recent excavations in Colchester, a town renowned for its rich Roman archaeology, have revealed more evidence from this period, spanning from the time of the AD 43 conquest of Britain into the 2nd century and beyond.

The post Roman ruins revealed under the Mercury Theatre appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-11 10:12   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: That old chestnut: how sweet chestnuts came to Britain

It has long been thought that sweet chestnut trees were introduced to Britain by the Romans – a belief popularised by 18th-century writers – but new research assessing archaeobotanical samples from this period has now cast doubt on such assumptions.

The post That old chestnut: how sweet chestnuts came to Britain appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-11 10:11   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Medieval projectile found a stone’s throw from Edinburgh Castle

A large carved stone that was probably launched from a medieval catapult or trebuchet has been excavated at Edinburgh’s Grassmarket. Similar in size and appearance to a cannonball, it was contextually dated to the 13th century – 200 years before the introduction of gunpower and cannons to Scotland. AOC Archaeology, who made the discovery, believes that it could have been used as a projectile,…

2019-03-11 10:10   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Roman road unearthed in Lancashire

A section of the Roman road that runs between Wigan and Walton-le-Dale has recently been uncovered – a noteworthy discovery, as its precise location has been debated for more than a century. The route was identified by a team from Salford Archaeology (University of Salford), led by Oliver Cook, who were working on behalf of Lancashire County Council and Maple Grove Development Ltd ahead of…

2019-03-11 10:09   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Science Notes – Laboratory spotlight: the Natural History Museum’s ancient DNA lab

For this month’s ‘Science Notes’, CA’s Deputy Editor Kathryn Krakowka visited the ancient DNA (aDNA) lab at the Natural History Museum in London, to talk to Professor Ian Barnes and Dr Selina Brace about the history of aDNA research, the functions of the lab at the NHM, and what projects they are currently working on.

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2019-03-11 10:07   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Deviant burials discovered near Bury St Edmunds

This month has brought a flurry of Roman news (as you can see on preceding pages), and one more discovery of this period is a 4th-century cemetery from Suffolk that was home to an unusually high number of ‘deviant’ burials.

The post Deviant burials discovered near Bury St Edmunds appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-03-11 10:06   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Current Archaeology 349 – now on sale

Three of our features this month focus on finds recently declared ‘Treasure’ according to the 1996 Treasure Act – legislation that has helped museums acquire many important artefacts for public display. The Heritage Minister has now proposed a number of revisions to the Act, and has launched a public consultation on them. See p.16 for […]

The post Current Archaeology 349 – now on sale

2019-03-11 10:04   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Lime Kilns: history and heritage

Whether you are an academic reviewing the history of lime kilns across Britain or simply an enthusiast who is interested in understanding more about how your local lime kiln functioned and how it fits into the wider historic landscape, this book is an easy and enjoyable read. David Johnson’s passion, knowledge, and enthusiasm for these historic structures is evident throughout.

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2019-02-21 11:16   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Clifton Quarry, Worcestershire: pits, pots and cereals

Clifton Quarry is a key site for the prehistory of the West Midlands. The outstanding discovery was an early Iron Age settlement, dating from a short period in the 6th to 4th centuries BC, consisting of numerous four-post structures, but curiously with no clear evidence for roundhouses. Charred grain and charcoal from the post-holes of the four-posters suggest that they burnt down and…

2019-02-21 11:15   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: London’s Crypts and Catacombs

Asked to think about catacombs, our minds might initially turn to the grand subterranean ossuaries of, say, Rome or Paris. However, London is not without its own underground burial places. In this brief but enjoyable book, authors Robert Bard and Adrian Miles take readers on a tour of former and extant catacombs and other hidden structures within and below some of the best-known cemeteries in…

2019-02-21 11:13   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Unearthing Childhood: young lives in prehistory

Robin Derricourt’s book is an overview of current and past research on the nature of the evidence for children in prehistory. As he points out, children are likely to have comprised about 50% of the population of most prehistoric societies, and so it is high time they were studied to the same degree as adults.

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2019-02-21 11:12   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Neolithic Britain: the transformation of social worlds

Over the recent past there has been a flurry of literature concerned with the Neolithic of the British Isles, each book promoting a new interpretation on the life and death of its people. This book is no exception. The literature has clearly shown that the Neolithic is a complex world of social relations and entanglement with ramifications to our present: we are products of this significant…

2019-02-21 11:11   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Late Iron Age Calleva: the pre-Conquest occupation at Silchester Insula IX

The decades leading up to the Roman conquest of Britain must have been a dynamic and turbulent time, a period of tribal manoeuvrings, with alliances made and loyalties tested in the face of increasing political and material influence from the Continent. From an archaeological perspective, however, the period can be frustratingly bland, with many sites in southern Britain lacking closely dated…

2019-02-21 11:09   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Meeting Brighton’s ancestors

For the past two decades, Brighton Museum & Art Gallery has had no dedicated space exploring the area’s archaeology. Now, though, thanks to a long-running campaign and a gift from a local benefactor, a stunning new gallery has just been opened. Carly Hilts went along to find out more.

The post Meeting Brighton’s ancestors appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-02-21 11:07   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Excavating the CA archive: cover photos from issues 101-200, part II

In last month’s column I highlighted some of my favourite covers from issues 101-200 (1986- 2005). Now I pick up where I left off, continuing my explorations of this era through the pages of Current Archaeology, and roving in time from the 3rd millennium BC to the 18th century AD, and in space from northern Scotland to the south coast of England.

The post Excavating the CA archive: cover…

2019-02-07 13:45   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Underneath the abbey: Uncovering more than 1,000 years of religious life in Bath

Modern Bath Abbey overlies the site of what was one of the largest cathedrals in medieval England. Now its remains, together with traces of the Anglo-Saxon monastery that preceded it, have been brought to light once more. Kirsten Egging Dinwiddy, Bob Davis, Cai Mason, Bruce Eaton, Sophie Clarke, and Marek Lewcun explain.

The post Underneath the abbey: Uncovering more than 1,000 years of…

2019-02-07 13:44   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Marylebone cold case

Given the recent cold weather, the discovery of a massive underground ‘ice house’, unearthed next to Regent’s Park in London, seems rather fitting. Built in the late 18th century, the subterranean chamber escaped damage during the Blitz bombings that destroyed the houses that stood above it, as well as local rebuilding in the 1960s. It was recently rediscovered by MOLA archaeologists working…

2019-02-07 13:43   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Exploring the lives of London’s 19th-century poor

A cemetery excavated on the site of New Covent Garden Market in Nine Elms, near Battersea, is illuminating the lives of some of 19th-century London’s poorest inhabitants. The investigation, which uncovered nearly 100 burials, was carried out by Wessex Archaeology as part of modernisation work on the site by the VINCI St Modwen, in partnership with the Covent Garden Market Authority.

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2019-02-07 13:41   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Roman lead coffins recovered in Surrey

Two decorated Roman lead coffins have been uncovered during recent work at a quarry in Surrey. Only a few hundred burials involving such caskets are known from the whole of Britain, with these latest examples discovered by Wessex Archaeology during work on behalf of Sibelco, a raw materials company.

The post Roman lead coffins recovered in Surrey appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-02-07 13:35   Click to comment

Current Archaeology: Cernunnos in Cambridgeshire

A figurine thought to be Britain’s only known example depicting the Celtic god Cernunnos has been found during the excavation of a late Iron Age/early Roman settlement in Cambridgeshire.

The post Cernunnos in Cambridgeshire appeared first on Current Archaeology.

2019-02-07 13:34   Click to comment


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