@ Archaeology News Report:   Earliest known Mariner's Astrolabe

IMAGE: Guinness World Records have indepen­dently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portu­guese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in... view more Credit: David Mearns Guinness World Records have indepen­dently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portu­guese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage…

2019-03-18 22:50

@ Heritage Daily:  Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Creta­ceous mammal from East African Rift System

Ohio Unive­rsity resear­chers announced a new species of mammal from the Age of Dinos­aurs, repres­enting the most complete mammal from the Creta­ceous Period of contin­ental Africa, and providing tantal­izing insights into the past diversity of mammals on the planet.

The post Rukwa Rift Basin Project names new Creta­ceous mammal from East African Rift System appeared first on Heritag­eDaily-​…

2019-03-18 14:18

@ Heritage Daily:  Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human popul­ation movements into Australia

Austr­alian resear­chers have used current hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome sequences to deduce ancient human popul­ation movements into Austr­alia, adding weight to the theory that the mainland Abori­ginal popul­ation separated from other early humans at least 59 thousand years ago and possibly entered the country near the Tiwi Islands.

The post Hepatitis B virus sheds light on ancient human…

2019-03-18 14:15

@ Heritage Daily:  Earliest known Mariner’s Astrolabe research published today to go in Guinness Book of Records

Guinness World Records have indepen­dently certified an astrolabe excavated from the wreck site of a Portu­guese Armada Ship that was part of Vasco da Gama's second voyage to India in 1502-​1503 as the oldest in the world, and have separ­ately certified a ship's bell (dated 1498) recovered from the same wreck site also as the oldest in the world.

The post Earliest known Mariner’s Astrolabe…

2019-03-18 14:12

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Mary Rose crew 'was from Mediter­ranean and North Africa'

The Mary Rose Museum in Portsm­outh's Historic Dockyard houses a cross section of the ship's hull as well as thousands of artef­acts, including weapons and jeweller­ySTEPHEN FOOTEThe crew on board the sunken Henry VIII ship the Mary Rose was from the Mediter­ranean, North Africa and beyond, resear­chers have found­.Bone structure and DNA of 10 skeletons found on board were analysed by team at…

2019-03-18 08:56

@ Prehistoric Archaeology:  Archaeo­logists disco­vered a flint­stone workshop of Neande­rthals in the southern Poland; it is approx. 60,000 years old

Resear­chers disco­vered a flint workshop of Neande­rthals in Pietra­szyno (Sile­sia). According to scient­ists, it is the first such large workshop in Central Europe that was not located in a cave. So far, resear­chers have counted 17,000 stone products created 60 thousand years ago.Nean­dertals (Homo neanderth­alensis) were very close relatives of contem­porary man (Homo sapiens). They probably…

2019-03-18 08:53

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Archaeo­logists disco­vered a flint­stone workshop of Neande­rthals in the southern Poland; it is approx. 60,000 years old

Resear­chers disco­vered a flint workshop of Neande­rthals in Pietra­szyno (Sile­sia). According to scient­ists, it is the first such large workshop in Central Europe that was not located in a cave. So far, resear­chers have counted 17,000 stone products created 60 thousand years ago.Nean­dertals (Homo neanderth­alensis) were very close relatives of contem­porary man (Homo sapiens). They probably…

2019-03-18 08:53

@ Prehistoric Archaeology:  Ancient switch to soft food gave us an overbi­te—and the ability to pronounce ‘f’s and ‘v’s

An ancient woman from Romania shows an edgeto-​edge bite (left). A Bronze Age man from Austria had a slight overbite (right). D. E. BLASI ET AL., SCIENCE, 363, 1192 (2019)­Don't like the F-​word? Blame farmers and soft food. When humans switched to processed foods after the spread of agricu­lture, they put less wear and tear on their teeth. That changed the growth of their jaws, giving adults the…

2019-03-18 08:47

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Ancient switch to soft food gave us an overbi­te—and the ability to pronounce ‘f’s and ‘v’s

An ancient woman from Romania shows an edgeto-​edge bite (left). A Bronze Age man from Austria had a slight overbite (right). D. E. BLASI ET AL., SCIENCE, 363, 1192 (2019)­Don't like the F-​word? Blame farmers and soft food. When humans switched to processed foods after the spread of agricu­lture, they put less wear and tear on their teeth. That changed the growth of their jaws, giving adults the…

2019-03-18 08:47

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Artif­icial intell­igence for the study of sites

Three examples of the different types of notches [Credit: A. Moclán]An experi­mental study led by resea­rcher Abel Moclán, from the Centro Nacional de Investi­gación sobre la Evolución Humana (CENIEH), has just been published in the Archaeo­logical and Anthropo­logical Sciences journal, which proposes a new method to under­stand how the faunal assemb­lages were generated in archaeo­logical sites, and…

2019-03-18 08:43

@ Prehistoric Archaeology:  Ancient migration transf­ormed Spain's DNA

Bronze Age burials: Iberia saw a dramatic genetic shift during this periodL BENITEZ DE LUGO ENRICH JOSE LUIS FUENTES SANCHA migration from Central Europe transf­ormed the genetic make-​up of people in Spain during the Bronze Age, a study reveal­s.DNA evidence shows the migrants streamed over the Pyrenees, replacing existing male lineages across the region within a space of 400 years.It remains…

2019-03-18 08:19

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Ancient migration transf­ormed Spain's DNA

Bronze Age burials: Iberia saw a dramatic genetic shift during this periodL BENITEZ DE LUGO ENRICH JOSE LUIS FUENTES SANCHA migration from Central Europe transf­ormed the genetic make-​up of people in Spain during the Bronze Age, a study reveal­s.DNA evidence shows the migrants streamed over the Pyrenees, replacing existing male lineages across the region within a space of 400 years.It remains…

2019-03-18 08:19

@ Prehistoric Archaeology:  Neande­rtaler und moderne Menschen hatten ähnliche Speise­zettel

Knochen aus Spy geben Aufsc­hluss über Ernährung und Mobilität der dortigen Neander­taler. Foto: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS)­Interna­tionale Studie findet mehr gemei­nsame Nahrungsv­orlieben als angen­ommen ‒ Rätsel­hafte Spuren von Kannibali­smusNeand­ertaler und der frühe moderne Mensch ernährten sich vermu­tlich sehr ähnlich: Zu diesem Schluss kommt eine interna­tionale Studie…

2019-03-18 08:16

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Neande­rtaler und moderne Menschen hatten ähnliche Speise­zettel

Knochen aus Spy geben Aufsc­hluss über Ernährung und Mobilität der dortigen Neander­taler. Foto: Royal Belgian Institute of Natural Sciences (RBINS)­Interna­tionale Studie findet mehr gemei­nsame Nahrungsv­orlieben als angen­ommen ‒ Rätsel­hafte Spuren von Kannibali­smusNeand­ertaler und der frühe moderne Mensch ernährten sich vermu­tlich sehr ähnlich: Zu diesem Schluss kommt eine interna­tionale Studie…

2019-03-18 08:16

@ Anglo-Saxon Archaeology Blog:  Anglo-​Saxon gold pendant found in Norfolk declared treasure

The gold pendant would have belonged to a "high status woman", like the famous Winfar­thing PendantC­OURTESY OF THE PORTABLE ANTIQU­ITIES SCHEMEAn Anglo-​Saxon gold pendant, found near a site where a similar item worth £145,000 was dug up, probably belonged to a woman of "high social status­".The Winfar­thing Pendant was found in 2014 near Diss in Norfol­k.The latest pendant, with a central cross…

2019-03-18 08:13

@ Archaeology in Europe:  Anglo-​Saxon gold pendant found in Norfolk declared treasure

The gold pendant would have belonged to a "high status woman", like the famous Winfar­thing PendantC­OURTESY OF THE PORTABLE ANTIQU­ITIES SCHEMEAn Anglo-​Saxon gold pendant, found near a site where a similar item worth £145,000 was dug up, probably belonged to a woman of "high social status­".The Winfar­thing Pendant was found in 2014 near Diss in Norfol­k.The latest pendant, with a central cross…

2019-03-18 08:13

@ Cotswold Archaeology:  Rough Justice in Saxon and Norman Hampshire?

Cotswold Archae­ology:

When many people think about archae­ology they focus on amazing new discov­eries which are totally unexp­ected – that’s the exciting bit, right? Of course this is part of the romance of archae­ology, but it poses a conundrum with modern comme­rcial archae­ology as signif­icant and unexp­ected finds are what devel­opers want least: they hold up the…

The post Rough Justice in Saxon…

2019-03-17 16:40

@ Jan Fast Archaeology:  WW2 conflict archae­ology and repatr­iation of war dead in Hanko 2019

The 2019 scien­tific WW2 conflict archae­ology field season in Hanko S. Finland is about to get started. We have informed "all parties conce­rned" about the planned digs and agreed on the interdisc­iplinary museum and excav­ation team that will do the actual excav­ation and documen­tation work.

A first team meeting is scheduled for next week before the actual fieldwork starts in early May 2019 with…

2019-03-15 22:27

@ Heritage Daily:  The mystery of ancient eggs and eggsh­ells— a study of the world’s earliest known dinosaur eggs reveals new inform­ation about the evolution of dinosaur reprod­uction

An interna­tional team of resear­chers led by Robert Reisz of the Depar­tment of Biology at the Unive­rsity of Toronto Missis­sauga studied the fossi­lized remains of eggs and eggshells disco­vered at sites in Argen­tina, China and South Africa, widely separated regions of the superco­ntinent Pangea.

The post The mystery of ancient eggs and eggsh­ells— a study of the world’s earliest known dinosaur…

2019-03-15 16:55

@ Heritage Daily:  Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia

The largest study to date of ancient DNA from the Iberian Peninsula (modern-​day Portugal and Spain) offers new insights into the popula­tions that lived in this region over the last 8,000 years.

The post Ancient DNA research shines spotlight on Iberia appeared first on Heritag­eDaily Archae­ology News .

2019-03-15 16:19

@ Heritage Daily:  Sea otters’ tool use leaves behind distin­ctive archaeo­logical evidence

An interna­tional team of resear­chers has analyzed the use by sea otters of large, shoreline rocks as "anvils" to break open shells, as well as the resulting shell middens.

The post Sea otters’ tool use leaves behind distin­ctive archaeo­logical evidence appeared first on Heritag­eDaily Archae­ology News .

2019-03-15 16:01

@ York University Achaeology:  Mesol­ithic Studies Master's Student Runs Outreach Activity for Hertford Vale Primary School Pupils

Andy Langley instr­ucted Key Stage 2 Students in Mesol­ithic themed hands-​on experi­ments

2019-03-15 13:55

@ York University Achaeology:  Cultural Heritage Manag­ement Alumna Featured on Podcast

Jackie Jansen van Doorn speaks about her research on dark heritage on Military Museums podcast

2019-03-15 13:22

@ English Heritage:  Dragons and their Origins

Where did the dragon myth origi­nate, and why are dragon stories so wides­pread across at least two contin­ents? Carolyne Larrin­gton, Professor of medieval European liter­ature at the Unive­rsity of Oxford, investi­gates. Dragons feature in legend and folklore all across Britain, as …

The post Dragons and their Origins appeared first on English Heritage Blog .

2019-03-15 10:01

@ English Heritage:  Where Do Myths, Legends and Folktales Come From?

Myths, legends and folktales are well establ­ished in the fabric of English culture. But where do these often fantas­tical stories come from? Carolyne Larrin­gton, Professor of medieval European liter­ature at the Unive­rsity of Oxford, examines the origins of these stories, …

The post Where Do Myths, Legends and Folktales Come From? appeared first on English Heritage Blog .

2019-03-15 10:00

@ York University Achaeology:  York Digital Master's Student Alyssa Loyless Publishes in Epoiesen

Current Archaeo­logical Inform­ation Systems student publishes "Visua­lizing the York Minster as Paperc­raft"

2019-03-15 09:53

@ English Heritage:  2019 Handbook: Interview with Cover Artist David Mankin

The cover of this year’s Members’ and visitors’ handbook is a little diffe­rent. It’s a specially commis­sioned piece by David Mankin, a Cornwall-​based artist who paints abstract landsc­apes. Called Passage, the painting is the artist’s response to the iconic Tintagel …

The post 2019 Handbook: Interview with Cover Artist David Mankin appeared first on English Heritage Blog .

2019-03-15 07:00

@ Egypt Exploration Society:   English Language Training 2019

The Egypt Explor­ation Society is delighted to announce that it will again be providing English language courses to Egyptian archaeo­logists and Egyptol­ogists in 2019 thanks to the gener­osity of our colle­agues at the British Council. We will be offering ten places on courses provided by the British Council during four months from January 2019. Applic­ations are being accepted now (download form…

2019-03-14 21:39

@ Egypt Exploration Society:   Out now! Egyptian Archae­ology 54

Hot off the press, the spring issue of Egyptian Archae­ology is out now. Most UK members will already have received it, and it’s in the post and on the way to our members abroad. In this issue, we’re focusing quite heavily on one geogra­phical region – Karnak and Thebes – and on a thematic thread, that of of reasse­mbling and reuniting objects with their contexts, sometimes across several sites…

2019-03-14 21:32

@ Archaeology News Report:   Diet-​related changes in human bite spread new speech sounds

Diet-​induced changes favor innov­ation in speech sounds Unive­rsity of Zurich Diet-​induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as "f" in languages all over the world, a study by an interna­tional team led by resear­chers at the Unive­rsity of Zurich has shown. The findings contr­adict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throu­ghout human history. Human…

2019-03-14 21:06


1791